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LYMEC: Council should revoke voting rights of Hungary

Published on January 11, 2012 by: in: Politics

Brussels. The European Liberal Youth (LYMEC) is calling for a procedure under article 7 of the Treaty on European Union [1] against the Republic of Hungary.

photo: Heather Tidrick
photo: Heather Tidrick

The current authoritarian developments in the Hungarian government are unprecedented in the history of the European Union. Revoking the voting rights of the Republic of Hungary in the Council is the only way to show the Hungarian government the seriousness of the situation and to leave no doubt as to the democratic will of the EU” states LYMEC President Alexander Plahr.
Constitutional changes were adopted in Hungary in December by the government’s two-thirds-strong parliamentary majority and took effect on 1 January.
They have sparked street protests in Budapest and are widely criticized as rolling back democratic checks and balances.
“The European Union is first and foremost a union of values. Limiting the parliamentary budget powers, the independence of the Central Bank, the judiciary and the media cannot be accepted in any European Member State. The steady erosion of Hungarian democracy and open society by the authoritarian Viktor Orbán must be opposed at all costs.
“We equally call on the member parties of the European People’s Party (EPP) and especially the Youth of the European People’s Party (YEPP) to clearly distance themselves from Orbáns Fidesz party (Magyar Polgári Szövetség) and to review its membership at their next congresses.” Plahr demands.
LYMEC is the youth organization of the European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party (ELDR) and the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats (ALDE) in the European Parliament. It represents over 50 liberal youth organizations in different European countries, totalling over 200.000 members.

[1] Excerpt from Article 7 of the Treaty on European Union (TEU):
“1. On a reasoned proposal by one third of the Member States, by the European Parliament or by the European Commission, the Council, acting by a majority of four fifths of its members after obtaining the consent of the European Parliament, may determine that there is a clear risk of a serious breach by a Member State of the values referred to in Article 2. Before making such a determination, the Council shall hear the Member State in question and may address recommendations to it, acting in accordance with the same procedure.
The Council shall regularly verify that the grounds on which such a determination was made continue to apply.
2. The European Council, acting by unanimity on a proposal by one third of the Member States or by the Commission and after obtaining the consent of the European Parliament, may determine the existence of a serious and persistent breach by a Member State of the values referred to in Article 2, after inviting the Member State in question to submit its observations.
3. Where a determination under paragraph 2 has been made, the Council, acting by a qualified majority, may decide to suspend certain of the rights deriving from the application of the Treaties to the Member State in question, including the voting rights of the representative of the government of that Member State in the Council. In doing so, the Council shall take into account the possible consequences of such a suspension on the rights and obligations of natural and legal persons.

The obligations of the Member State in question under this Treaty shall in any case continue to be binding on that State.”

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About Alexander Plahr

German liberal politician. Since 2010 he is serving as President of the European Liberal Youth (LYMEC), the umbrella organization of liberal youth organizations in Europe.

Original Liberte.pl
Fredrich Naumann Foundation For The Freedom
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